Licence To Kill

Licence To Kill

Posted on 17 September 2010

The darkest, mort realistic and most violent Bond film yet, “Licence To Kill” was Timothy Dalton’s second and last appearance in the role.

The Living Daylights

The Living Daylights

Posted on 17 September 2010

It was widely known that Pierce Brosnan was the producers preferred choice to replace Roger Moore, so the announcement that Timothy Dalton was to take up the Walther PPK came as something of a shock to Bond fans.

A View To A Kill

A View To A Kill

Posted on 17 September 2010

Bond is back and he’s practically drawing his pension. Roger Moore’s final appearance was the 1984 blockbuster “A View To A Kill” and it’s not one of the best, hardly a fitting send off to the longest running Bond who had become synonymous with the character in the minds of the public.

Diamonds are forever

Diamonds are forever

Posted on 16 September 2010

Having previously turned down the chance to reprise the role of Bond, Sean Connery was persuaded back to don the tuxedo one more time by being offered the then record breaking sum of $1.25 million and a percentage of the profits.

You only live twice

You only live twice

Posted on 09 September 2010

In a departure from the norm, “You Only Live Twice” did not use the plot of the novel that it was supposedly based on, and during it’s production, Sean Connery announced that he was giving up the role of Bond.

Thunderball

Thunderball

Posted on 09 September 2010

With a title that sounds like a very uncomfortable medical condition, “Thunderball” was to become the highest grossing film in the Bond canon, which is just as well as it was also one of the most difficult to be made in the first place.

Octopussy

Octopussy

Posted on 04 September 2010

Roger Moore had been against returning as Bond for this film but was persuaded to stay by Cubby Broccoli who felt that an established actor was needed to face up to competition from a returning Sean Connery in the rival Bond film “Never Say Never Again”, released in the same year.

For Your Eyes Only

For Your Eyes Only

Posted on 04 September 2010

John Glen made his Bond debut as director on this movie, Moore’s fifth and one of his best. It starts with a tender moment, Bond laying flowers at the grave of his wife Tracy, a nice piece of internal continuity, followed up by an appearance by Blofeld (at least that’s the implication, legal difficulties made it impossible to name the character on screen).

On Her Majesty’s Secret Service

On Her Majesty’s Secret Service

Posted on 03 September 2010

With that line, the first movie in the Bond franchise not to star Sean Connery kicks off in a confident and assured style, full of panache and strong enough in its own success now to be able to break the fourth wall and offer a knowing wink to the audience.

Goldfinger

Goldfinger

Posted on 03 September 2010

Helmed by franchise newcomer Guy Hamilton who had previously turned down the chance to shoot the first Bond movie and with a budget three times that of “Dr No”, “Goldfinger” with it’s memorable Shirley Bassey sung theme song told the story of Auric erm…